Cleaning engineered hardwood floors takes a considerable amount of effort and skills to pull off successfully and safeguard it from severe damage.

Cleaning engineered hardwood floors successfully

Cleaning engineered hardwood floors successfully

Caring for engineered hardwood floors give your home a unique, lovely style that lasts for years.

Cleaning the spills

Spills in the home are routine, especially when you have little children around the house. For the best result, clean up any spillage as soon as it happens with hardwood floor cleaner to avoid staining the floor. Prolonged exposure to moisture could lead to extensive damage and staining of the engineered wood flooring. Sometimes the liquid can seep between the veneer and the board layers, resulting in a permanent stain. In such instances, you might have better luck replacing the board than trying to remove the stain.

Cleaning the spills

Use area rugs on flooring

The flooring in the high traffic areas of the house suffer the greatest damage, and you should take measures to minimize the wear and tear. Using mats in such traffic corridors protects against scuff marks and scratches. However, you need to lift and dust the carpets on a regular basis since they tend to trap fine dust on the floor. The dust could act as an abrasive and scratch the engineered flooring, especially when someone slides on the rug. However, placing mats by your doorways is a superb way of safeguarding your engineered hardwood floors from damage that results from dirty footwear.

Use area rugs

Impose a no shoe policy in the house

Given the high cost of replacing or refinishing engineered hardwood floors, imposing such a rule is the cheaper option. House slippers pose a minimal scratch danger when compared with the regular shoes. Have the little ones appreciate and abide by the rule, since they are biggest culprits when it comes to floor damage. Supply your visitors with a pair of flip-flops rather than having them walk barefoot on the cold floors. As your visitors get used to your new rule, you may find that they will come with slippers or flip-flops of their own.

Impose a no shoe policy in the house

Sweep the floors on a daily basis

You get the best results by sweeping the floor daily since the dirt acts as an abrasive that scrapes away the protective finish, leaving the floor vulnerable to damage. You can use a soft broom and a dustpan to dislodge any loose dirt, dust and debris from the floor, as it is the most common method of cleaning engineered hardwood floors. Make a thorough sweep part of your routine each day so it always gets done.

Damp mopping

After sweeping, you can use a slightly wet mop to remove the remaining debris from your floor. Soaps with a neutral pH, such as dishwashing soap, are the best choice since they are unlikely to corrode the surface finishing. Alternatively, you can opt to use a mild cleaner, including Murphy Oil Soap or a specialty hardwood floor cleaner such as Eco Mist Colloid. You should never attempt to use a mixture of vinegar and water when cleaning wooden floors. The same case applies to ammonia and solutions containing ammonia, since they could damage the finishing. Wet the mop with the cleaning solution and wring out most of the water, and then mop in the direction of the wood grain. Alternatively, you can do a thorough job by scrubbing the floor by hand with a damp cloth. Apply as little water as possible and clean up any spillage quickly to avoid leaving the floor damp.

Vacuuming

You can vacuum your wooden floor daily or at least once in a week with a lightweight weight vacuum cleaner or one that is specific to wooden floors. If you're using the regular kind, turn off the rotating bristle bar by setting the machine to a hard floor mode. Any mistake when using a vacuum cleaner could lead to the rotating brushes causing severe damage to your floor. A regular vacuuming routine eliminates dirt and dust particles that could scratch and damage the engineered wood flooring surface. For additional sparkle and shine, you can put your choice of cleaning solution in a spray bottle and apply a thin layer to the floor. Using a microfiber cloth or mop, wipe the floor following the wood grain. If this does not help to bring out the shine and luster of your floor, maybe it is time arrange for a professional refinish.

Replace or refinishing

Typically, you have two choices when dealing with worn or damaged engineered flooring materials: a complete replacement or refinish. The thickness of your current floor determines the ability to refurbish it. With thick flooring, over three-quarters of an inch, you can have more than one refinishing. Typically, you can wring more than 80 years from such a thick floor and possibly more. Any floors that are less than three-eighths of an inch need complete replacement after a period of 10 to 15 years. The longevity of your floor mostly depends on the amount of traffic it handles as well as the efficiency of the care routine. Stay on top of your cleaning and maintenance schedule to get the longest life out of your floor as is possible thanks to cleaning engineered hardwood floors.

Replace or refinishing